**Update: Wednesday, the Ohio House of Representatives voted to pass Senate Bill 215.

Find more on this story right here.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WJW) — Proposed legislation that would eliminate a permit requirement for Ohioans concealing a carried firearm is moving one step closer to passage.

Tuesday, Senate Bill 215 was moved through the House Government Oversight Committee and is now headed to the full house. The committee heard from opponents and one proponent of the bill before voting to move the legislation on, with some amendments added.

The bill would also make it so carriers do not have to tell law enforcement they have a weapon during a traffic stop unless directly asked.

Committee member Rep. Tavia Galonski (D-Akron) issued a statement following the move voicing her frustration with the bill.

“SB 215 is anti-public safety and anti-police,” Rep. Galonski said in a statement. “This legislation puts Ohio law enforcement officials in the line of fire and makes them less safe. We need to be taking steps to make our communities safer, and this dangerous bill does the opposite.”

Meanwhile, those in favor of the legislation say the bill allows for people to more fully realize their Second Amendment rights.

“Ohioans are already permitted to open carry firearms, however, once an individual were to put on a sweatshirt or jacket, they would be in violation of the law,” State Sen. Terry Johnson (R-McDermott) who sponsored the bill, said back when the Senate passed the legislation in December. “Senate Bill 215 solves this problem and further removes restrictions to Ohio’s Second Amendment rights.”

If the House does pass the legislation, it has to go back to the Senate for a final sign-off before heading to Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine‘s desk.

If passed, Ohio would become the 22nd state to not require permits for concealed carry, Sen. Johnson’s office said.

Read more on the bill right here.