***Editor’s Note: This story has been corrected to state that Tamara McLoyd was sentenced to 54 years to life in prison on several charges.***

CLEVELAND (WJW) — A 19-year-old woman has been sentenced to life in prison with eligibility of parole after 54 years for killing Cleveland Police Officer Shane Bartek and for several robberies in Cuyahoga County.

Judge John O’Donnell on Tuesday sentenced Tamara McLoyd for the murder of off-duty officer Bartek, as well as the string of other robberies, which prosecutors say “terrorized” seven other victims.

With all her combined sentences, she won’t be eligible for parole for decades — likely not until she’s in her 70s, Judge O’Donnell said.

Tamara McLoyd

“You are a walking id,” he said. “You threatened, you stalked, you stole, you robbed and you killed without compunction. Your sentence is condign.”

McLoyd, who was 18 years old at the time of Bartek’s murder, approached the 25-year-old man outside of his apartment building. She is convicted of shooting and killing him, then stealing his car.

Shane Bartek. Photo courtesy Jacqueline Ketterer

The off-duty officer was walking to his car and headed to a Cavs game.

Hours later McLoyd posted a video of herself partying.

Police later found McLoyd sitting with two other women in a car at a gas station and placed her under arrest.

It all happened while she was on probation to Lorain County Juvenile Court. The FOX 8 I-Team found no one from the court had ever checked up on her.

Prosecutors presented video of the police interrogation of McLoyd, during which she eventually admitted that she shot Bartek during the robbery on New Year’s Eve.

McLoyd turned down a chance to speak when asked by the Judge.

Her mother asked for mercy, saying McLoyd has battled mental illness.

“Tamara has been fighting her own battles since the age of 5,” she said.

McLoyd did not face the death penalty but she could remain in prison for the rest of her life. Prosecutors asked for a sentence of 30 years to life for Bartek’s murder.

Sentencing proceedings began at 1 p.m. Tuesday.

Shane’s mother Debra Bartek was one of several people who delivered impact statements before Judge O’Donnell. The night her adopted son Shane was killed, she had to lean on a police officer while looking at her son’s body — “so my legs didn’t buckle,” she told the court.

Summer Bartek, Shane’s twin sister, said she and her brother were born into difficult circumstances. “The odds were stacked against us,” she said. Now, she considers herself a “twinless twin.”

“That was our life, intertwined together in every memory, experience and moment. We were Shane and Summer — the twins,” she said. “Our souls were connected by a cord so strong, so powerful — nothing could break it, except death.”

Shane’s brother Eric told the court though Shane was his younger sibling, he looked up to the police officer in many ways.

Since then he said he’s been “grieving every single day that I will never get to see or talk to him again; regretting not spending one more hour with him that afternoon.”