AKRON, Ohio (WJW) — City police officers seen on video removing “Justice for Jayland” signs from a utility pole “violated no policy, procedure, or law,” Akron Police Chief Steve Mylett said in a statement Friday.

Terry Riddle spent the last days before his death putting up about 300 signs around the city drawing attention to the police shooting of Jayland Walker in June. But their placement went against city code, which forbids posting signs or notices on tree lawns, medians, expressway fencing, utility and traffic poles and other public fixtures.

Mylett, in his Friday statement, said the department reviewed the incident and determined an officer did remove the sign as reported, but that there was no wrongdoing.

“However, we recognize the impact this incident has had on our community, and it prompted numerous productive discussions within the police department about the expectations for our officers as they interact with the community we serve,” Mylett wrote.

Mylett’s statement does not specify what other actions may be taken in the matter. The department declined media interviews on the statement.

Riddle’s daughter Autumn, who captured the footage in question, spoke to FOX 8 in November, after filing a formal complaint to the department.

“We thought the signs were being removed by kids in the neighborhood…people who wanted to start drama,” she said. “To know that he spent his last days coming out and putting up the posters just to have them come out and tear them down for no reason at all is just kind of petty. I think its petty.”

WJW photo

Officers shot the 25-year-old Walker 46 times following a pursuit during which they claimed Walker fired a gun out of a vehicle. He later got out of the vehicle and fled on foot. Investigators later determined Walker left a gun and a loaded magazine in the vehicle.

A state investigation of the shooting continues.

Attorney Bobby DiCello, who represents Walker’s family, accused Akron police of censoring free speech when he spoke to FOX 8 in November.

“The officers who took down those signs should not be officers because they are taking personally the First Amendment rights of folks who have seen the death of Jayland Walker or know his death and they’re stepping on those rights,” he said.

Read the police department’s full statement below:

In recent weeks, Chief Mylett became aware of a video posted on social media showing an Akron Police officer holding what was reported to be a ‘Justice for Jayland’ sign while a second officer was with him. The person narrating the video said the officers removed the sign from a utility pole. After watching this video, Chief Mylett immediately called for a review of the incident.

While supervisors worked diligently to unearth the facts, numerous internal and external conversations were had about what is legal, what is policy, and ultimately what are the expectations of our community.

A thorough review was conducted, and it was determined that an officer did remove the sign from the pole as reported. Ultimately, the involved officers violated no policy, procedure, or law. However, we recognize the impact this incident has had on our community, and it prompted numerous productive discussions within the police department about the expectations for our officers as they interact with the community we serve.

We are steadfast in our commitment to building stronger relationships with our community, and we each have a vital role to play in this endeavor. For months, efforts to create a more open dialogue have been ongoing. We remain committed to working with the community and other stakeholders to achieve this and many other objectives. The members of the Akron Police Department will continue to work tirelessly with the citizens of Akron to achieve the common goal of a safer city for everyone. As we move forward, solidifying these partnerships is critical as we strive to enhance public safety and earn the community’s trust.