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Couture Pattern Museum Celebrates 65th Anniversary of Vogue Paris Night Looks

From Left to Right: Red silk-wool haute couture dress from the house of Ricci. White and pink floral chiffon dress design from the house of Heim. Royal Blue chiffon dress with white silk wool coat from the house of Patou.

From Left to Right: 1957 haute couture dresses from the house of Ricci, Heim, and Patou. Dresses recreated from the Couture Pattern Museum's archives

From left to right: Royal Blue Patou chiffon dress with white silk wool jacket, design from the house of Patou, Black velvet floor length gown with gathered vertical pleats from the house of Gres.

1957 ensembles from the house of Patou and Gres from the Couture Pattern Museum's archives

Visitors to the Couture Pattern Museum exhibition examining the authentically recreated black velvet Madame Gres gown

Visitors to the Couture Pattern Museum exhibition during Santa Barbara's 1st Thursday Artwalk closely examining the authentically recreated black velvet Madame Gres gown

Dress designs from original Vogue 1957 haute couture patterns displayed at monthly Santa Barbara 1st Thursday Art Walk

During the height of haute couture, Conde Nast made these patterns available to the home seamstress so she too could wear the best fashion designs.”
— Cara Austine
SANTA BARBARA, CA, UNITED STATES, November 4, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ -- The Couture Pattern Museum was thrilled to celebrate the 65th anniversary of Vogue magazine's 1957 Paris Night Looks last night at the popular 1st Thursday Art Walk in downtown Santa Barbara. The museum’s inaugural exhibition invited culture enthusiasts to a special fashion display of dresses made from original, commercial haute couture patterns that had been featured in the November 15, 1957 issue of Vogue.

Cara Austine is the Santa Barbara artist, fashion historian and couture seamstress who authentically recreated the dresses. The exhibition explored dresses designed by four iconic haute couture designers – Gres, Heim, Patou and Ricci.

“During the height of haute couture, Conde Nast made these patterns available to the home seamstress so she too could wear the best fashion designs,” said Austine, the founder of the Couture Pattern Museum. “The original 1957 Vogue magazine launch represented a time in history when world-famous Parisian designers officially licensed their haute couture designs, line-by-line, for the home seamstress through authentic paper patterns.”

At the Art Walk, Couture Pattern Museum patrons were able to walk amongst the elegant spirit of the democratization of high fashion represented by these four lively recreations. The special dresses were exhibited side-by-side with original patterns, magazine photos and store counter books as high-fashion provenance from 65 years ago.

The Couture Pattern Museum oversees one of the world’s largest and most significant collections of commercial haute couture and high-fashion sewing patterns released by international and American fashion design houses, focusing principally on the golden age of couture (1947-1957). It is a privately held teaching museum with a historical dressmaking Atelier located in downtown Santa Barbara.

The 1st Thursday Art Walk, co-hosted with Workzones, Santa Barbara, is an evening of art and culture for downtown Santa Barbara. Participating galleries and venues offer free access to visual and performing arts in a fun and social environment. Visitors enjoy fashion, art openings, live music, artist receptions, lectures, wine tastings and hands-on activities.

The Couture Pattern Museum welcomes donations and invites people to sign up for sewing classes and register for its newsletter.

For more information and to order a dress from the museum atelier, visit couturepatternmuseum.com.

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Cara Austine
Couture Pattern Museum
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