Ohio Supreme Court to hear case over Columbus bump stock ban

A 7,62X39mm round sits next a a 30 round magazine and an AK-47 with a bump stock installed at Good Guys Gun and Range on February 21, 2018 in Orem, Utah. The bump stock is a device when installed allows a semi-automatic to fire at a rapid rate much like a fully automatic gun. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A divided state Supreme Court has accepted an appeal by Ohio’s capital city fighting to keep its ban on bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly.

Columbus, which banned the devices last year, is challenging an appeals court ruling allowing gun rights activist Gary Witt to challenge the ban. The Columbus city attorney argued Witt hadn’t been harmed by the gun law.

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 Tuesday to accept the case.

Two gun rights groups, Ohioans for Concealed Carry and the Buckeye Firearms Foundation, were previously removed from the lawsuit after the 10th District Court of Appeals said they didn’t have standing to bring a challenge.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.