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When are you most likely to get a speeding ticket? See what the I-Team found

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(WJW) -- Drivers, before you get another speeding ticket, look at what the FOX 8 I-Team has found.

We’ve been investigating tickets throughout Northeast Ohio, looking into the most common speeds leading police to pull over drivers.

We started digging after one local mayor claimed you only get a ticket on the highway in his town if you’re going at least 14 miles over the speed limit.

In Cleveland, we reviewed dozens and dozens of recent speeding tickets to get a snapshot of enforcement on city streets and highways.

For the tickets we reviewed in Cleveland, we found the average speed 18 miles per hour over the limit.

We saw a range on the Cleveland tickets from 10 miles per hour over the limit to 33 over.

The I-Team also checked statewide. The Ohio Highway Patrol analyzed tickets for various speed limits. We found something consistent with Highway Patrol citations: Most drivers pulled over by troopers are going 15 miles over the speed limit. For instance 85 in a 70, or 70 in a 55.

The Village of Linndale has become notorious for speeding tickets issued by traffic cameras. You get cited there for 11 miles over the limit.

Linndale takes in about a million bucks a year from camera ticket fines. Yet, Police Chief Tim Franczak said, “We wanted to not be a money grab, or not have the appearance of a money grab. If you cite someone one mile over that is lawful.”

In Newburgh Heights on I-77, the mayor has explained repeatedly traffic cameras there are set to spit out tickets to drivers caught going 14 miles over the speed limit.

Newburgh Heights Mayor Trevor Elkins told us for a previous story, “These citations are not given to people going 4, 5, 6 miles over the speed limit. They are going 14 miles over the speed limit which is about 25 percent greater than legally allowed.”

Retired Cleveland Police officer Jim Simone became a legend for his traffic enforcement. He says most officers just know when a driver deserves a ticket.

He said, “I wrote 100,000 tickets. I’ve never been told a specific speed to go after. You use common sense pulling somebody over.”

He added, police often find more than bad drivers during a stop. Simone said, “Murderers, robbers, people dealing drugs are caught on traffic stops, so when you’re out there doing traffic, you’re involved in a lot of things.”

Nobody likes getting a ticket. Nobody likes dangerous drivers either. And it seems everyone wants a bit of a break.

We met drivers outside court. One man said, “70, 75, 72, you’re not going as fast as other drivers.”

A woman told us, “I looked down. I didn’t think I was doing 76. He said, you’re doing 76.”

In the end, records show slowing down can save lives. The Ohio Highway Patrol says, this year, speed has been a factor in nearly a third of all deadly crashes. And records show similar numbers for at least the last five years.

**Take a look at the number of speed-related crashes and percentage of crashes related to speed**

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