I-Team hidden camera investigation –buying a gun in one minute

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CLEVELAND (WJW)- A FOX 8 I-Team hidden camera investigation takes you inside local gun shows.

Mass shootings in Ohio and around the country have put a new spotlight on guns.

So we went to local gun shows where you can pick out a gun, pay with cash and walk out the door with the weapon. No background checks are done if the person buying the gun is an Ohio resident and is purchasing the gun from a private seller, who also is an Ohio resident. All that is needed is cash and your Ohio driver's license.

An I-Team producer bought a gun for $200 and walked away with it in a minute and 20 seconds.

"Just need your Ohio (driver's license) or your Giant Eagle (grocery store) card," the private seller can be heard saying to the producer on video. Our producer showed his license, paid the cash and walked out with a 9 mm Carbine.

Ohio is one of 29 states where private citizens don't need to run background checks when selling firearms at gun shows. Only licensed dealers need to run background checks.

So any Ohio resident can sell a gun to another Ohio resident.

Some call this the gun show loophole.

We took our hidden camera to gun shows in Cuyahoga, Summit and Medina counties.

At one show, another private seller said for him, it’s “cash and carry.”

Our producer told another person selling guns his license is expired, and he wondered if he could use it. The response he got was, “You could probably use it. But probably shouldn't.”

"So much is sold without background checks," said David Waldeck, of Akron. He spoke to the I-Team while he was protesting outside a recent gun show. "I think there should be universal background checks."

There is a push to change the so-called gun show loophole. This comes after mass shootings in Ohio and around the country. Ohio's governor and others have proposed new rues for gun shows.

James Dowdell, a former gun show promoter, says most people selling guns at gun shows know the rules and follow the rules.

"Why should we be treated as criminals because some criminals get guns?" Dowdell said.

He wonders if tightening laws around gun shows would make much difference on your streets.

"Any new laws, I don't think will be more successful than the laws we have," Dowdell said.

State lawmakers are discussing changes to laws surrounding buying and selling guns.

In the end, you see why some folks say fix the system. But others believe more rules and new laws won’t likely fix anything.

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