Cleveland Clinic performs first purely laparoscopic living donor surgery for liver transplant

Data pix.

CLEVELAND, Ohio - The Cleveland Clinic has successfully performed the Midwest’s first purely laparoscopic living donor surgery for liver transplantation in an adult recipient.

That's according to a press release from the hospital.

The laparoscopic procedure is performed with surgical tools and a camera inserted through a few half-inch holes in the abdomen of the living donor.

The procedure is minimally invasive, and the Clinic says it benefits the living donor, because the post-op recovery is quicker.

According to the Clinic, on August 19, Choon Hyuck David Kwon, M.D., Ph.D., director of Laparoscopic Liver Surgery at Cleveland Clinic's Digestive Disease & Surgery Institute, led a team of surgeons and nurses during the procedure that extracted a third of the liver from a 29-year-old living donor.

In an adjacent operating room, Koji Hashimoto, M.D., Ph.D., Cleveland Clinic’s director of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, and his team received the donated segment of the liver and performed the transplant in a 66-year-old recipient.

“Living donor liver transplantation can save sick patients before they become too ill for a transplant,” said Dr. Hashimoto.

Since the first case at Cleveland Clinic in August, Dr. Kwon and his team have successfully performed the purely laparoscopic procedure on four more living liver donors, the hospital says.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.