Stow police release video showing moment officer hit by car while directing traffic at scene of crash

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STOW, Ohio -- Stow police released footage from the body camera worn by Officer Barry Smith showing the moment he was hit by a car while helping direct traffic at the scene of a crash early Wednesday.

Smith, who is a school resource officer at Stow High School, was on his way to work when he came to the scene of the two vehicle crash at the busy intersection of Graham and Fishcreek roads.

"There were two cars that had collided they were blocking the roadway, so he and another officer were on the scene helping direct traffic around that area because you have kids and teachers and so forth heading to the school, going to work, it's a very busy intersection," said Stow Police Lt. Ken Mifflin.

Smith was telling another officer to allow traffic to continue through the intersection from his direction when his body camera shows him flying through the air and landing on the rainy pavement.

"He got hit in the lower extremities and the impact caused him to fly up over the car, hit the windshield and fall to the ground," said Mifflin.

Police said the 16-year-old was driving through the intersection around a flatbed tow truck when he apparently did not see Officer Smith in the intersection, even though Smith was wearing a reflective vest.

"At that hour of the morning at 7:16, it was still dark even though it's a well lit intersection and you have all the other emergency vehicles with their lights going on. You want the public to see you so accidents like this don't happen," said Mifflin.

The driver did stop at the scene and has been cited for making an improper turn.

Officer Smith suffered a broken leg and was taken to a local hospital.

Stow police said he will need surgery to repair the injury to his leg and may not be back on the job for several months or longer.

He is the second Stow officer injured this year while trying to help re-direct traffic.

Police said it helps enforce the need for all drivers to be completely alert when behind the wheel, particularly at a chaotic scene where officers and first responders are doing their job.

"We are definitely counting our blessings that the injuries to Officer Smith will hopefully still allow him to come back to do the job that he loves to do, but yes, we know that it probably could have been worse and we are very thankful that it wasn't," said Mifflin.

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