Cursive writing returns to Youngstown City School District

A pupil practices cursive writing at Triadelphia Ridge Elementary School in Ellicott City, Maryland on October 15, 2013. For third-grade pupils at Triadelphia Ridge Elementary School, learning to write joined-up letters is a no-brainer, but outside the classroom, grown-up Americans are debating whether the nation's children should be studying cursive at all. (Photo credit: Robert MacPherson/AFP/Getty Images)

 YOUNGSTOWN –After being removed from the daily curriculum, cursive writing is making a return in the Youngstown City School District.

“Research shows that learning to write in cursive is beneficial to our scholars and we want to provide them every advantage we can,” said Justin Jennings, YCSD’s chief executive officer.

Last year,  former Ohio Governor John Kasich signed the law requiring the Ohio Department of Education to create instructional materials for cursive writing through fifth grade. The law stops short of requiring schools to teach it.

According to the news release from the Youngstown City Schools, several years ago, handwriting instruction was removed from the Ohio English Language Arts standards. Several other states dropped cursive writing instruction. Those decisions came after many states adopted the national Common Core curriculum practices.

This year,  for 10-to-15 minutes a day, Youngstown City School District students will be taught handwriting as part of the English language arts curriculum in K-5 grade.  Students in younger grades will be taught printing, while students in third grade will begin learning cursive.

 

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