Man says he carried children to safety during El Paso shooting

Customs and Border Patrol police walk past individuals that were evacuated from Cielo Vista Mall and a Wal-Mart where a shooting occurred in El Paso, Texas, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. - A shooting at a Walmart store in Texas left multiple people dead. At least one suspect was taken into custody after the shooting in the border city of El Paso, triggering fear and panic among weekend shoppers as well as widespread condemnation. It was the second fatal shooting in less than a week at a Walmart store in the US and comes after a mass shooting in California last weekend. (Photo by Joel Angel JUAREZ / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOEL ANGEL JUAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

EL PASO, Texas — A witness to Saturday’s mass shooting in El Paso, Texas says he carried lost children to safety during the incident.

Glen Oakley, who identified himself as a military member with a license to carry a gun, told reporters he was shopping at a Foot Locker nearby when he heard gunshots, according to MSN News.

Oakley reportedly pulled out his own gun for protection and headed towards the parking lot when he noticed a group of scared, unattended children.

He says he tried to get as many to safety as possible.

“I got my bag in my hand, so I was just trying to pick them up one by one, as many as I can and just run out,” Oakley told a local KTSM reporter.  Video of his interview has since been posted to Twitter.

“I hope nothing happened to the kids. I tried to pick up as many as I could and bring them out with me,” Oakley added. “I wasn’t really worried about myself. It just brings back flashbacks of, ya know … I just hope those kids are alright, that’s all I’m thinking about right now is those kids. I’m not even worried about myself.”

El Paso police said  twenty people were killed and more than two dozen injured  during the shooting.  The suspect, a 21-year-old man, has been arrested.

The shooting is the 21st mass killing in the United States in 2019, and the fifth public mass shooting. Before Saturday, 96 people had died in mass killings in 2019 — 26 of them in public mass shootings.

Continuing coverage, here.

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