Artist creates stamp placing Harriet Tubman on $20 bills as act of ‘civil disobedience’

Courtesy: Tubman Stamp

NEW YORK — A New York designer is taking an act of “civil disobedience” after Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin announced on Wednesday that a redesign of the $20 bill featuring Harriet Tubman’s face would not be ready in time for its planned 2020 release.

In April the treasury announced that Tubman would replace Andrew Jackson on the $20.

According to USA Today, on Wednesday, Mnuchin said the bill’s delay could could last eight years, citing “counterfeiting issues” as the reason behind it.

This news brought attention to a previously released product, a single-color ink stamp, intended to replace Jackson’s face with Tubman’s.

In an Instagram post, 33-year-old Dano Wall, the Tubman Stamp’s creator, suggested that citizens use the product as an act of civil disobedience.

As of Friday morning the product has completely sold out on Etsy.  However, USA Today reports there are two businesses in New York City that serve as “stamping stations.”

Wall reportedly said the stamp has been a project in the making since 2017.  He has a goal of putting 5,000 stamps into circulation.

The Tubman Stamp’s website also provides instruction on how to make your own stamp.

The website also states that the stamp is legal and cites The Stampede, an effort to stamp bills with messages “to protest big money in politics.”

Continuing coverage, here.

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