Mom learns she’s having twins while in labor

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. — A first-time mom from Michigan learned she was having twins after doctors spotted a second head during her 47-hour labor.

Nicole Ziesemer, 31, had just met her daughter, Blakeley, when doctors spotted another head and realized she was still in labor, according to Fox News.

The couple reportedly wanted to have a “natural pregnancy” and had only one scan on the day Ziesemer went into labor.  Doctors believe that the second baby, Cabe, was hiding behind his sister, so he wasn’t seen on the scan.

“It was really scary when they said that something else was inside me,” Ziesemer told the news outlet. “And when they told us that it was another baby I literally asked her if she was lying! I just couldn’t take it all in and was still in so much pain that it was almost impossible to process.”

She had planned a natural home birth but reportedly had to go to the hospital when her water broke at 36 weeks.

After being in labor for 45 hours Ziesemer opted for an epidural and just two hours later, at 10:06 p.m. on Dec. 30, Blakeley entered the world.

However her doctors grew concerned when Ziesemer was still in pain after the delivery, Fox News reports.  While medical officials were trying to retrieve the placenta it became obvious something wasn’t right and they decided to do an emergency ultrasound.

59 minutes later she gave birth to Cabe.

“It was crazy. We were over the moon but in utter shock,” Ziesemer told the news outlet. “There were really no signs that I was carrying more than one baby, in fact people said how small I was. We thought the biggest surprise was going to be the sex of the baby, little did we know!”

Ziesemer is now home with her family.  She and her husband, Matthew, have since purchased duplicates of all the baby equipment that they previously had for just one child.

The couple told Fox News now they can’t imagine just having one baby.

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