More districts banning or reducing homework, report says

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When it comes to homework, more school districts believe less is more.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Ridgefield Public School District in Ridgefield, Connecticut has placed time limits on homework for most students. It’s also banned on weekends and school vacations.

In Louisiana’s Lafayette Parish School System, teachers were told not to grade homework for any students.

The goal, these districts say, is to give students more time to read, sleep and spend time with family.

“Student wellness is becoming a much larger issue,” Mark Toback, superintendent of Wayne Township Public Schools in Wayne, New Jersey, told the Wall Street Journal.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, the average number of hours high-school students spent on homework increased from 6.8 in 2007 to 7.5 in 2016. It remained flat at 4.7 for students in K-8.

Some teachers and parents don’t like the changes.

Some teachers told the Wall Street Journal that eliminating homework takes away a tool to reinforce their lessons. Some parents said cutting homework made them feel left out of the academic process.

Harris Cooper, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, has studied homework for more than 25 years.

His research, according to the Wall Street Journal, found homework has little impact on elementary students. Students in middle school and high school did show higher achievement when doing homework between one and two hours per night.

*Click to read more from the Wall Street Journal

 

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