There’s a reason you can’t buy just one or two things at Target

CHICAGO - MAY 23: Shoppers pay for their merchandise at a Target store May 23, 2007 in Chicago, Illinois. Today, Target Corp. reported an 18 per cent increase in their first-quarter profit, beating analysts' expectations. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

It’s a question that’s probably crossed your mind on an occasion or two: Why do you walk into Target with just one or two things on your list, but you walk out with an overflowing cart full of items?

It looks like there might be a scientific reason behind this.

According to Refinery 29, experts say major chain stores like Target are good at making “clever, cross-category associations in the physical placement of merchandise,” like those discounted items you see right there near the entrance of the store.

They’re also clever with their layouts and do a good job choosing what to put out near the checkout lines like certain sweet treats and snacks, and even batteries and DVDs.

According to Refinery 29, Target’s bright and happy aesthetic also encourages more impulse buying.

Target’s VP of store design told Refinery 29, We know that some guests want to grab a coffee at Starbucks and explore the aisles, so we’ve added features like dynamic product vignettes throughout the store that help guests envision how things will fit into their lives.”