25 indicted for trafficking heroin, fentanyl and more in Elyria

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ELYRIA, Ohio-- Twenty-five people were indicted for their roles in a drug trafficking ring in Elyria.

The U.S. Department of Justice said the drugs included fentanyl, carfentanil, heroin, cocaine, crack cocaine and fentanyl pressed to look like Percocet pills.

“Opioids are killing people every single day in Ohio, and I firmly believe that those trafficking drugs into our communities have no regard for human life,” said Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine. “This case is yet another example of our commitment to stopping drug traffickers who are fueling the opioid epidemic, and I applaud the state, local, and federal authorities who aggressively worked on this case.”

The following people are charged in the 59-count indictment:

  • Troy Davis, 37, of Elyria
  • Reginald Jenkins, 40, of Elyria
  • Stephen Phares, 25, of Elyria
  • Deondre Vaughn, 35, of Cleveland
  • Jarell Davis, 29, of Cuyahoga Falls
  • Leon Lamont Washington, 42, of Elyria
  • Raymond Trenell Oliver, 43, of Elyria
  • Anthony Rodgers, 35, of Cleveland
  • Elonzo Davis, 44, of Elyria
  • Quadron Johnson, 31, of Elyria
  • William Solomon, 43, of Elyria
  • Malik Hobson, 38, of Elyria
  • Johnnie Lawrence, 38, of Elyria
  • Richard Fluker, 59, of Elyria
  • Troy Martin, 37, of Cleveland
  • Myron L. Pryor, 47, of Cleveland
  • Alvin Fennell, 48, of Elyria
  • Terrance Williams, 25, of Elyria
  • Aaron White, 22, of Elyria
  • Alkeem Fennell, 25, of Elyria
  • Cassandra Studebaker, 25, of Elyria
  • Courtney Warrens, 25, of Elyria
  • Tommie Richardson, 27, of Elyria
  • Arthur Solomon, 45, of Elyria
  • Mickey Tramaine Wright, 25, of Elyria

The indictments were a result of a nine-month investigation involving Elyria police, Lorain police and the Lorain County Sheriff's Office.

According to investigators, Davis and others used houses in Elyria to store and sell the drugs. They used rental cars and prepaid phones to operate their business.

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