I TEAM Exclusive: See and hear how Olmsted Falls Scout leader tried to beat sex charges

CLEVELAND - The FOX 8 I TEAM has obtained exclusive video showing how an Olmsted Falls scout leader tried to beat sex charges just after he got arrested for repeatedly sexually assaulting a teen Boy Scout.

Cuyahoga County Prosecutors released the video to the I TEAM now that Aaron Robertson has been sentenced.

On Tuesday, Judge Pam Barker gave him 8 years in prison, and she labelled him a sex offender.

Video of the Olmsted Falls Police interrogating Robertson shows he denied the claims of the victim and denied there were any other victims.

Robertson told Chief Bill Traine and a detective, "I don't have anything else to tell you."

And at one point, Robertson tried to blame the accuser. He said, “Called me a dirty, sexy boy, and I said, ‘That's disgusting.’

And he's like, ‘I want you to do something bad to me.’ And I said no.”

Finally, police spoke to Robertson about what might happen if the case went to a jury,

“And, who do you think they're gonna believe?" He answered, "They're gonna believe the kid.”

Robertson’s lawyers tried to have the interrogation thrown out. When a judge allowed it, he plead guilty to several charges for Sexual Battery and Gross Sexual Imposition.

Robertson had also served as a volunteer Auxiliary Police Officer for Olmsted Falls.

At sentencing, Cuyahoga County Prosecutors read a letter from the victim. He wrote the Scout leader had “manipulated” and “isolated’ him.

Robertson said to the judge, "Ah, sorry for the terrible situation that has happened. Sorry for the mistakes that were made. Need to correct the issues that were generated from this. Sorry this has happened. Looking forward to coming out to further help the family and the need that they have. And create a business, and move forward."

Judge Barker, though wondered if Robertson is really sorry. She said, "There was no mention of ‘I did this.’ ‘I did this to this young man.’"

Investigators found the sex assaults took place in various places. Among them, in a building used by Scouts right behind an Olmsted Falls elementary school. Other crimes happened in the Scout leader`s house, at a camp, and even on a trip to an Air Force base.

No other victims ever came forward, but the Scout wrote how he felt he did something brave by speaking out to protect others from Robertson.

Some close to the case wanted more prison time. At one point, during the interrogation, police asked Robertson what he thought might happen if the case went to a jury? He answered, "They're gonna believe the kid."

More on this story, here.