Port Clinton declares state of emergency due to widespread flooding

PORT CLINTON, Ohio -- The city of Port Clinton has declared a state of emergency and is asking residents to limit travel and use caution due to widespread flooding.

About four inches of rain fell overnight, flooding buildings and causing the city to close about 14 roads.

Magruder Hospital experienced flooding on its main floor, affecting its main lobby, gift shop, HR and radiology hallway, which were closed to patients, visitors and employees.

The hospital said no patient care areas were affected.

"No patient care areas were affected," the hospital said in a statement.

Magruder Hospital Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Nick Marsico said he anticipates closed portions of the hospital will reopen by Friday.

"Luckily, there were no patient care areas affected at all by this, so it affects our patient flow and visitor flow through the hospital," he said.

Port Clinton city officials said city pumps were working properly and functioning at maximum capacity, but high water levels in Lake Erie were limiting the ability of floodwaters to recede.

The city is working with Ottawa County Emergency Management Agency and the Ottawa County commissioners as they move forward in restoration of services to the city.

Lee Avenue was hit hardest by flooding, with several feet of water covering the street late Wednesday, submerging two vehicles and flooding basements.

"Frustrated? On a scale of 1 to 10, I'm on a 20. I mean, I was up all night long," said Sherry Murphy, whose new pickup truck was totaled by the flooding.

Her lower level flooded with several inches of water after it backed up through her shower. Murphy had a sump pump running all day and said she's had to replace her lower level carpeting three times due to flooding.

"The city has got to do something with these small drain pipes that are in here, they gotta install more of these pumps," she said. "This is ridiculous. I mean all of us missed work today. Every one of us."

Ottawa County Commissioner Jim Sass said officials declared a state of emergency in case state funds become available for cleanup.

"It came down pretty hard. It was just more than what the drainage systems could tolerate, so the water backs up into the streets," Sass said. "Both the village and city are going to have some cleanup efforts to help people out."