Closings and delays

Sneezing, itchy eyes, stuffy nose? Spring allergy season is here

WESTLAKE- It’s that time of year again!

And for allergy sufferers, the symptoms are the same.

"Little bit sore-throaty, itchy, ears itch, you know that kind of thing, inner-ear itch."

"A slight headache, a constant slight headache and then I just get very stuffed up."

Pollen counts can begin to rise in late winter and lasts until late spring, sometimes early summer in many areas of the country.

And pollen levels seem to be going up across the globe, with the climate change in turn, affecting allergy season.

That, according to Doctor Dawn Zacharias with University Hospitals.

"When we have a mild winter, we usually expect a long, hard spring. Also, when we have a lot of fluctuating temperatures or early temperatures, we usually expect a high spring count,” says Dr Zacharias.

Tree pollen counts are moderate in Northeast Ohio right now.

But grass and ragweed pollen will soon be in full effect.

Zacharias said, "But what that pollen does is that it actually causes an immune reaction. So most people don't, aren't affected by pollen but if you're an allergy sufferer you're immune system makes a reaction against it to try to get rid of it."

So how do you know it’s not a cold?

Well, allergy symptoms, including sneezing, runny nose and headache can last for several weeks.

A cold typically is gone within three to five days.

Doctors say you can limit pollen contact by driving with the car windows up and simply limiting the amount of time spent outdoors.

"I'm a gardener, so that's very difficult."

"It's a nice concept, but I can't sit around in air conditioning all the time, I'm out working. So you just take what you have to take and suffer a bit."

And remember, doctors say you can develop seasonal allergies as an adult.