Discovery of baby girl killed in Russian plane disaster could hold clues to cause of crash

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SHARM EL-SHEIKH, Egypt — Just before their flight left for Egypt, Darina Gromova’s mom took a picture of her little 10-month-old daughter looking out the airport window at a big plane just outside.

Darina’s mother posted the photo on social media before leaving St. Petersburg, on their way to Egypt for vacation.They never made it; Darina and her parents were among 224 people who died when their Russian passenger jet broke apart in mid-air over the Sinai Peninsula.

There’s been much speculation about the cause of the crash, but now, investigators believe the tiny toddler could hold the key to what brought down that jet.

Daily Mail reports that Gromova’s body was found more than 21 miles away from the main crash site, which indicates that the plane may have exploded much earlier than experts previously thought.

The search zone has been expanded as a result, which could lead to more clues.

The bodies of Gromova’s mother haven’t yet been found.

Daily Mail reports that on Thursday, a Russian official said there are two versions under consideration as to what may have caused the crash. One was something exploded in the plane or a technical problem with the plane. It’s not believed the plane went down due to an external cause.

Russian and Egyptian authorities say forensic evidence from the scene will reveal what happened to the doomed jet.

U.S. intelligence assessments suggest that someone planted a bomb on the plane before takeoff, multiple U.S. officials said Wednesday, and that someone inside Sharm el-Sheikh airport could have helped.

However, Egyptian Civil Aviation Minister Hossam Kamel said it’s too early to make that suggestion.

British Prime Minister David Cameron says it’s “more likely than not.” U.S. President Barack Obama says “it’s certainly possible.”

But Russian and Egyptian authorities pushed back Thursday on suggestions that a bomb brought down Flight 9268, saying there’s no evidence yet to support that theory.

Read more here.

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