Clinton has edge in Nevada, site of Democrats’ first debate

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LAS VEGAS  — Democratic candidates for president will take the stage for their first debate this week in Nevada.

The state is a reminder of why Hillary Rodham Clinton is the front-runner.

Nevada is home to large communities of immigrants and uses a convoluted caucus system. That means winning the state requires a higher degree of organization and effort to get out the vote.

Clinton installed staff on the ground in Nevada six months ago, and she now has 22 paid operatives in Nevada who have recruited more than 3,000 volunteers.

Meanwhile, Vermont independent Sen. Bernie Sanders has just one paid staffer in Nevada.

And Vice President Joe Biden has yet to decide whether to run and does not yet have any formal campaign operation.

Also on the day before the debate, Democratic presidential hopeful Martin O’Malley says the nation needs not just new leadership but a new way of governing, one that invites people of all parties “to return to the table of democracy.”

O’Malley spoke via video link Monday to about 1,000 New Hampshire voters at an event hosted by No Labels. The group was created after the 2010 midterm elections to bridge the divide between Republicans and Democrats.

The former governor of Maryland says he’s achieved results with a “circle of collaboration” that focuses on what works.

No Labels leaders described the convention as “speed dating” for New Hampshire’s independent voters, who can vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries.

Republican Gov. John Kasich of Ohio was among seven other candidates planning to participate, each introduced by someone from the opposing party.

Click here  for bios on each of the 2016 presidential candidates. And stick with Fox 8 and Fox8.com for more on the race to the White House.

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