Police looking for driver who hit, seriously injured man heading to work in Green

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GREEN, Ohio-- Summit County authorities are asking for help identifying a driver who hit and badly injured a 64-year-old man, and then left the scene. The man was walking to work when he was hit.

About 6:45 Thursday morning, Larry Engel parked his car across the street from Shaffer's Market in Green,  where he has worked for more than 30 years.

Witnesses said as he was crossing the street the driver of a dark-colored car sped up to pass a delivery truck and hit Engel, who was near the center line of the road.

Tiffany Snider was in her car with her children and said it was terrifying. "I saw him take a step backwards and all I heard was a 'bam' and he rolled off of my car," said Snider, explaining "it happened in a matter of seconds."

Snider, who stopped to do what she could to help Engle, said she never really got a good look at the car that hit him because, in her words, "they were flying."

Snider said the car was dark, perhaps black, and appeared to have tinted windows.

She believes it should have damage to the front, and perhaps a broken driver's side rear-view mirror.

But she said the driver "made no attempt to stop...just hit him and kept on going."

Kim Kalos, who has worked with Engel for about fifteen years, came out of the market to help.

"Oh he was bad. He was bleeding from his hand and his shoulder and he couldn't stand on his right leg at all," said Kalos.

Engle has worked as the market's produce manager and Kalos said even as badly injured as he was all he could think about was getting back to work, but he couldn't.

"They ripped the keys out of his hand and that's what cut his hand and the mirror impacted his shoulder," added Kalos.

Engel underwent surgery at an Akron hospital on Friday where he was listed in good condition.

Authorities hope the damage on the car will help tip someone off as they try to identify who is responsible.

"The person that hit him there is no way, pretty much no way possible that they couldnt know that they hit somebody so they knowingly fled the scene," said Summit County Sheriff's Office Inspector Bill Holland.

"There's got to be damage because there was glass on the road and the delivery guy heard the impact over his truck so there's no way that they didnt know they hit him," said Kalos.

"I don't know how anybody could sleep, for one thing. I don't know how anybody could sleep. I just have no idea how anybody could hit somebody and turn away, you know? That's like a human being," said Cheryl Babigoff, another of Engel's co-workers.​