Stolen Ashley Madison user data published by hackers

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NEW YORK– Hackers who hit infidelity dating site Ashley Madison on Tuesday posted customer data they stole, experts say.

The data is posted on what is known as the “dark web,” a part of the Internet that can’t be searched by Google or most common search engines. It also can only be viewed with a special Tor browser, according to Per Thorsheim, a cybersecurity expert in Norway. The information that was posted included customer names and credit card numbers, Thorsheim said.

The site, which is designed to help married people cheat on their spouses, said it is actively monitoring this situation and working with law enforcement in the United States and in Canada, where the site is based.

“This event is not an act of hacktivism, it is an act of criminality. It is an illegal action against the individual members of AshleyMadison.com,” the site said. “The criminal, or criminals, involved in this act have appointed themselves as the moral judge, juror, and executioner, seeing fit to impose a personal notion of virtue on all of society.”

The hack attack was first revealed a month ago. At that time hackers who called themselves the “Impact Team,” said they would release “profiles with all the customers’ secret sexual fantasies and matching credit card transactions, real names and addresses, and employee documents and emails,” if the site was not shut down. Samples of the stolen data were published at that time, according to the hackers.

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