Facebook CEO teams up with LeBron for ‘Lean In’ women’s rights campaign

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Facebook CEO Sheryl Sandberg has a new business partner: Cleveland’s own LeBron James!

She’s teaming up with LeBron, Stephen Curry and other NBA players to persuade more men to fight for women’s rights.

It’s all part of the #LeanInTogether campaign, prompted by the popularity of best-selling book “Lean In,” which focuses on encouraging women to pursue their ambitions. The #LeanInTogether campaign aims to grow that philosophy by continuing to “lean in” and inspire women.

Sandberg’s plan is to have the players give PSAs during NBA games and on the major networks over the next few months.  In a 30-second video of NBA and WNBA all-stars, we see LeBron holding up a poster, which says “All-Star Dad.”

Dwayne Wade of the Miami Heat says, “When men lean in, everyone wins,” and then touts how he leans in for his wife, mother and grandmother.

“Help women aim high,” says Al Horford of the Atlanta Hawks.

What Sandberg and LeanIn.org are also hoping to do is show men specifically what they can do, providing a series of tips about things they could start doing at home and at work, and as managers, as soon as they finish reading this story.

Many of the suggestions might seem like common sense to many women — such as male managers giving women credit in meetings and men sharing 50-50 in household and child care duties at home.

But Sandberg says with the list of “simple, clear, everyday things, practical things” men can do that are based on real data, men will see not only how they can help but how they individually will benefit.

Another huge goal, Sandberg says, is showing men they won’t lose out in the workplace when there is more equality in the executive suites and in boardrooms.

“If you’ve long been in the majority and long-held power, and you see change, you could naturally be nervous that this wasn’t going to help you,” said Sandberg. Men need to realize it’s not a zero sum game, she said.

“When companies do better, there are more jobs, more promotions, more salaries for everyone. When companies do worse, there’s less for everyone,” she said.

Sandberg is the second highest ranking executive at Facebook, behind Mark Zuckerberg.