Urban Meyer, Buckeye fans stranded at sea on cruise ship

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“Never finished” may have been the theme for the Ohio State Buckeyes after winning the National Championship, but it also seems to be the theme for the Buckeyes Cruise for Cancer.

The ship was stranded in the Florida waters for nearly a day and a half after fog prevented the it from docking in Tampa Monday morning.

Coach Urban Meyer, his wife Shelley Meyer, fans and a number of former players, including Cleveland radio personality Dustin Fox from 92.3 The Fan, were on board. Also on board, the brother of Fox 8 sports anchor John Telich.

“The fog was so thick and heavy that we could not see the water from our room balcony on deck 10,” said Mike Telich.

The 5-day cruise left Cozumel, Mexico on Thursday and was supposed to dock Monday morning.

Finally, Tuesday afternoon, the announcement was made that everyone would soon be back on shore.

“At 1 p.m. today, we were about 12 miles off shore, south of Tampa, and got word the port pilot was going to board and guide us into port,” said Telich.

Three guide boats were brought in to lead the cruise ship through the fog.

“We had to pass under the Tampa bridge before high tide at 4 p.m.,” said Telich. “About 3:40 p.m., we passed under the bridge to the cheers of O-H-I-O.”

Telich tells Fox 8 that passengers were able to get off the ship around 7 p.m.

Some travelers were allowed to get back on board after clearing customers to use the ship as a hotel for the night.

Despite the long days at sea and the canceled flights, passengers still found a way to have fun.

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New theme for the @buckeyecruise #neverfinished

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The Buckeye Cruise for Cancer was spearheaded by Urban and his wife.

The cruise raised over $2 million for cancer research at  the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute.