Astronauts take shelter after alarm at International Space Station

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station said they evacuated a segment of the facility because of an alarm that could indicate an ammonia leak, but there is no hard evidence that there was an actual leak. "So, big-picture perspective, we're trying to figure out exactly what happened. We're not entirely convinced that this is an ammonia leak," commander Barry Wilmore told NASA Mission Control in Houston.

(CNN) — A possible leak in the cooling system on the International Space Station has resulted in the evacuation of the U.S. crew from the American segment of the station to the Russian segment, NASA said Wednesday.

The U.S. astronauts are safe, the agency said.

The Russian Federal Space Agency earlier reported that there was a leak in the cooling system, but NASA described the relocation as a precautionary move following an alarm. A leak has not been confirmed, NASA said.

The American section of the space station is isolated while astronauts investigate the cause of the alarm.

NASA said its crew responded to increased pressures in the station’s cooling loop. This could indicate an ammonia leak, NASA said.

Two U.S. astronauts are aboard the International Space Station — commander Barry Wilmore and flight engineer Terry Virts.

“So, big-picture perspective, we’re trying to figure out exactly what happened. We’re not entirely convinced that this is an ammonia leak,” Wilmore told NASA Mission Control in Houston.It is possible that the alarm was set off by a faulty sensor or some other cause, he said.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.