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Pothole Killer: Relief Rolls into Town

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CLEVELAND--Desperate times called for desperate measures in Cleveland where additional money is being spent to fill potholes on city streets.

“They’re in poor shape,” said Ray Timura, who commutes through the city during the week. “I take this way. I’m taking a whole side street just because I don’t wanna go down West Boulevard which is a total mess.”

For weeks, Clevelanders have been crying out for help. Many have already been forced to pay for damage done to their vehicle, including Jessie Pierce who said, “They need to fix the whole Cleveland area. Cleveland’s nothin’ but a pothole!”

On Tuesday, some relief rolled into town. The ‘Pothole Killer’ from a Pennsylvania company can fill holes in just minutes using a spray injection patching system. The Director of Public Works in Cleveland said they’re paying thousands of dollars to borrow the truck that’s here to help his overwhelmed crews.

“We’ve had such a cold winter and such a thaw, that when we get these thaws like we’re having now, you have a lot of problems with your streets and with your infrastructure,” said Michael Cox.

According to the city, the contract for the ‘Pothole Killer’ allows for 1,100 hours of repair time at $225 an hour. That’s an extra $247,000 being spent with money from a capital improvement program. According to Cox, they don’t know yet if it’ll be money well spent.

“We’re looking at it to see how it works. We’ll gauge it at the end of this process to see if it helps us to get through this and make sure the citizens have a nice, smooth ride home and to work,” said Cox.

The street department has 200 employees and at least six five-man pothole crews out when the weather permits. According to the city, the ‘Pothole Killer’ will only help solve a problem that many say has gotten out of hand.

“Potholes are terrible. They can create so much damage so I think it’s a good investment,” said Belinda Montinez.

Over the next few weeks, the ‘Pothole Killer’ will be on various streets that need the most attention throughout the city.

Last year, Brunswick became the first city in Northeast Ohio to contract with the same company. In an email to FOX 8’s Mark Zinni, Brunswick’s Director of Public Service said the patches have held up very well during this harsh winter.

“There were (are) an incredibly large number of freeze/thaw cycles this past winter that have really increased the number of potholes,” said Patrick McNamara.

“When compared to a standard hot-mix asphalt patch, the 'Pothole Killer' seems to have performed very well. On asphalt streets it performed remarkably well. As far as it being a good investment, I would say yes,” said McNamara.

Brunswick officials said they plan to schedule more time with ‘Pothole Killer’ in April.

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6 comments

  • Dion M. Bass

    Chuck Holes are at the worse this year ….Its about time that we finally received some help in this war of the infectious dis-ease coined Cleveland versus CHUCKY virus….don”t catch a chucky, your car’s life may depend on it. …………..Thank you.

  • Dion M. Bass

    As you drive, watch out, and if you sit as a passenger in any vehicle shout the call out {CHUCKY}, chucky ahead, chucky ave.,to help in damage control to suspensions this season…

  • Kevin B.

    The contract allows for 1,100 hours of repair time at $225 dollars an hour…. so if they take their time and fix only 3 potholes in 1,100 hours…. thats a nice $247,500.00.. I think they should pay by the pothole.

  • Deborah

    Repairs to the front end, tires, and rims. Then there is the wheel alignment. Who is going to pay for those repairs?? They can shell out those kind of money for an hour, then fix my pickup truck as well as other vehicle’s who got front end damage!!

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