Kasich’s Tax, Education Changes on Tap

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio Gov. John Kasich is preparing to release details of an ambitious election-year policy document that addresses taxes and education and streamlines government services for the poor and unemployed.

The Republican governor’s mid-biennium review, or MBR, was expected out Tuesday. Testimony is set to begin in the GOP-led Ohio House on Wednesday afternoon.

Kasich said during his State of the State speech last month that the bill would include his plan for driving Ohio’s personal income tax rate to below 5 percent. That will likely involve a second attempt at increasing Ohio’s tax rate on big oil and gas drillers, as well as new taxes on tobacco products.

The bill is also expected to provide details of Kasich’s plans for educating Ohio’s budding young workforce and retraining the unemployed.

 

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5 comments

  • lu lu

    can you please lay off the tobacco taxes. Find something else to pick on. I believe this to be a good case for bullying!!
    .

  • Tim Smith

    I do not smoke, but I have to wonder. Why levy additional taxes on tobacco products if smoking is on the decline? Seems that is only going to hurt potential voters. How about streamlining the state’s services, eliminating the pork spending and put a tax on lobbying instead?

  • Tim Smith

    Additionally, it is high time these government officials who get paid lofty salaries stop using tax dollars for perks and pay for them directly out of their own pocket. They can afford their own cars and gas, pay their own way for flights, hire and pay for their own drivers, etc. etc.

  • TJ

    I agree. These officials, who recently have been dogging Teachers for snow days, also took days off because of the weather. Are they going to work on Saturdays or cancel their vacations? I think not.

  • Kevin B.

    Next he’ll want to legalize and tax pot and make millions. Crazy talk i say, crazy talk…. i wonder why they call it a sin tax anyway..i don’t remember smoking being a sin (checks Bible)..lets call it what it really is a ” I don’t like your lifestyle choices so I’m going to penalize you” tax.

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