Meet Lee Ann Miller: Bread + Me = True Love Always

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Hey. Now, before I go making any formal introductions you should know something about me. I love bread. I mean, if singing lullabies to a warm loaf of yeasty goodness wouldn’t throw me into full-blown weirdo status, I would sing to bread at the top of my lungs. I love it that much. So if you hate bread, we probably won’t be “besties.” Okay, so that’s out of the way.

My name is Lee Ann Miller. I live in Ohio’s Amish Country, surrounded by rolling hills, horse and buggies, and mashed potatoes. Some days I wonder, “How did I end up here?” Do you ever wonder that? How did I get here??

In my case, I fell in love. Like head-over-heels “bread love.” I laid eyes on my young Amish man almost 22 years ago and here we are, living the country life.

We own a bed & breakfast called The Miller Haus. My husband, Daryl, is shy, reserved, and quiet and the best man I know. I am not shy, quiet, or reserved, so we make an opposites-attract-type match. I wanna be old with Big D.

He’s that awesome. We are Dad and Mom to two of the most extraordinary boys, Teddy and Joey. We love being parents.

I got connected here at FOX8 in 2008 through Kenny Crumpton. I was doing a food/recipe demonstration at an RV show at the IX Center and met Kenny.

We did a recipe together ideal for RV road trips and he mentioned the Morning Show and handed me the contact information of a producer and the rest is history.

I am a guest on the Recipe Box and have loved every minute spent with the wonderful team at FOX8. I hope we grow old together too!

Just about every week you’ll find me here, sharing things that happen from my home and The Miller Haus B&B. And really, to celebrate my appearance here, I gotta share my bread recipe. Well, because it’s the right thing to do.

Welcome to my life.  I’m glad to be here.

The Miller Haus White Bread

2-1/2 c. warm water

1 heaping Tablespoon yeast

¼ c. white sugar

½ c. vegetable oil

1 Tablespoon salt

½ c. sour cream

5-1/2 to 6 c. all-purpose flour

Additional ½ to ¾ c. all-purpose flour for kneading

Dissolve yeast (I love the saf-instant brand yeast) in warm water and 1 tablespoon of the white sugar. Stir together with wire whisk and allow mixture to sit for 10 minutes. The sugar helps activate the yeast and the mixture will get a frothy look after sitting for 10 minutes.

Stirring with wire whisk add remaining sugar, oil, salt and sour cream. Make sure all those ingredients are well incorporated. Add all-purpose flour one cup at a time, switching from a wire whisk to a heavy-duty spatula after about 4 cups of flour. Dough will form a soft ball and be a consistency that is ready to knead. If you can’t handle the dough without you hands getting really gooey, just add a bit more flour.

Pour about ½ c. flour on counter surface and spread into a circle, making ready for kneading the dough. During the kneading process you may need to add small amounts of flour at a time to keep the dough from sticking to the counter. Don’t be afraid!

I like to knead my dough about 50 times. The dough will have a smooth and elastic feel when it’s ready to put in the bowl to rise. I like a good size greased stainless steel bowl for the bread while rising. Allow the dough to raise double in size (about 1-1/2 to 2 hours) in a warm, draft free spot in your kitchen. I love punching down the dough after it has finished rising, I have lovely memories with our children punching bread dough! I simply take my fist and punch the dough while it’s still in the bowl. I then turn it out onto a freshly floured surface and knead it a couple of times and make out two 2lb. loaves. Place each loaf into a greased bread pan and allow rising again until double in size (about 45-60 minutes).

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Gently place loaves into the oven and bake about 35-45 minutes. After about 25 minutes of baking I brush each loaf with some melted butter, it gives the bread a golden appearance! I absolutely love my probing thermometer for bread baking. After the loves have been in the oven about 30 minutes I put the probe into one of the loaves and when the internal temperature of the bread is 200 degrees it is ready to come out of the oven.

After removing the bread from the oven I allow the loaves to sit a couple minutes and then brush them again with butter. We simply love warm bread and jam!

Lee Ann's bread

Lee Ann’s bread

*Be sure to ‘like’ “The Miller Haus Bed and Breakfast” on Facebook and follow me on Twitter by clicking here.*

3 comments

  • Jane Greenland

    I always enjoy Lee Ann Miller on the Fox 8 recipe show. I’ve learned a lot from her and enjoy her personality and all the good recipes she passes on to all of us. Stay connect Lee Ann! And bring more of those great recipes!

  • Lee Ann

    Hey there Lynda- I always prick my bread with a fork to allow for air movement and also because my Grandma always did it! This happens right when you put the loaves in the pans before they begin their final rise! Hope that helps!

Comments are closed.