Ghost App: ‘Spirit Story Box’ Put to the Test

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AVON, Ohio-- Paranormal investigators have claimed for years that they can communicate with ghosts, but could a new iPhone app prove it?

A local ghost hunter was willing to try the app and see for herself.

Paranormal investigator Annie Carissimmi has researched and recorded some interesting findings at the Vintage House Café in Avon.

Monday night, she revisited the historical building on Detroit Road and met with the owners, Roberta and Kevin Walker.

Kevin is skeptical but Roberta and others claim they’ve seen and heard all sorts of strange activity.

“I’ve noticed the doors swinging and closing and opening,” said Robert, adding, “I’ve also heard footsteps up and down the stairs.”

The old stone structure which is now a quaint café was once a doctor’s office in the 1930s.

Patients were treated and even some surgeries were performed at the building.

Monday night, a different type of operation got under way.

Annie, Roberta and FOX 8 News Reporter Suzanne Stratford tested the new iPhone ghost hunting app called “Spirit Story Box.”

Annie says ghosts can convert energy into words and speak through different types of equipment in real time, like something called the Ovulis, which looks almost like a small transistor radio.

“They have voice to them and I believe spirits can use that to communicate with you,” said Annie.

The new app supposedly works in a similar way, but using different technology.

Ghost hunters and the founders of StreamSide Software, Roger Pingleton and Jill Beitz, developed the app.

“We had played with some other apps that are out there and we just thought we could improve upon it a little bit,” said Beitz.

The exact technology is proprietary but basically they say it organizes information and translates energy into words.

“A simple way of putting it is it looks for order in chaos,” said Pingleton.

And it has produced sometimes shocking results.

Jill explained how three different groups of people at different times used the app near an old-fashioned school bus.

“They got the same words: throat, broken neck and choked and we found out later that a girl had been choked to death right on that bus,” said Beitz.

We wondered what it might say at the café, and it didn’t take long to find out.

Within minutes of turning the app on, it began spitting out words and phrases including but not limited to: shin, engineer, using chisel, crow bar and harm neck.

"The random phrases all seemed like they related to someone being injured,” said Roberta.

Was it a coincidence or something else?

There is no way to know for sure but both the ghost hunter and business owner agreed that the 99¢ app, which took only minutes to download, was super easy to use and a whole lot of fun.

“Sort of like the magic 8 ball. It’s more for entertainment but it is possible for a spirit to communicate that way so I wouldn’t rule anything out,” said Carissimmi.

The app also lets you save, share and keep track of the words and phrases that come through.

For the best results, Jill and Roger recommend taking the phone and app to a place that is known or suspected to be “haunted” and to allow it to run for longer than 10 minutes before turning it off.

They encourage people to have an open mind  and to have fun investigating.