Petraeus’ Mistress: ‘I’ve Made Some Mistakes’

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(Photo Credit: Aspen Security Forum/MGN Online)

By Kevin Liptak, CNN

(CNN) — After weathering a political and personal scandal that made her the subject of glaring media scrutiny, Paula Broadwell says she’s ready to move forward.

The former Army reservist who became romantically involved with Gen. David Petraeus while penning his biography, and was later accused of sending threatening e-mails to another woman, Broadwell told a local television station in Charlotte she’s returning to the faith-based environment of her childhood.

“I grew up in a strong faith-based family,” Broadwell told News 14 Carolina-Charlotte. “I think I have selected to return to those roots for strength, for my family, for myself and to protect our children and to forgive others and move on and face forward.”

She was speaking after attending a YMCA-sponsored prayer breakfast in Charlotte, which she said had “touched her heart.”

“I’ve made some mistakes in the past but I’m trying to look forward with my family,” she said.

In November, Petraeus resigned from his post as CIA director after admitting to an extramarital affair. In the days that followed, U.S. officials said the Federal Bureau of Investigation had discovered Petraeus was romantically linked with Broadwell, who herself was under investigation for sending allegedly harassing and anonymous e-mails to a socialite living in Tampa, Florida, who was friendly with Petraeus and his wife.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Tampa ultimately decided against bringing federal cyberstalking charges against Broadwell.

In the course of the investigation, the FBI also discovered classified materials on Broadwell’s computer, though sources said the information wasn’t highly sensitive.

As the scandal broke, Broadwell was cast in the media as an infatuated “other woman” who jealously protected her relationship with Petraeus. Reporters camped outside her brother’s house in Washington, waiting to catch a glimpse of the woman who helped bring down the nation’s spy chief.

But speaking now, Broadwell says attention is not what she’s after.

“I’m not seeking publicity,” she said. “I’m seeking meaningful work,” noting she’s been involved with veteran organizations in the past.

“At the end of the day, I count my blessings being in this wonderful country and our wonderful community and having such a wonderful family and opportunities and the opportunity to rebuild,” she said.

— CNN’s Carol Cratty and Adam Shivers contributed to this report.

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