City Officials Respond to Deadly Chase Investigation

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CLEVELAND -- Cleveland Police Chief Michael McGrath received a vote of confidence from Mayor Frank Jackson Tuesday, on a day when Ohio Attorney General Michael DeWine concluded that the deadly pursuit in November was a failure of the system and police command.

The chase and police officer-involved shooting happened November 29.

When Cleveland Police Chief Michael McGrath was asked, "If someone were to ask for your resignation, what would your response be?" Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said,"Hold it, no. Ain't nobody going to ask for it, so he don't have to answer that."

Here is how McGrath answered when asked what responsibility he takes in the case: "My response to that would be, in the Cleveland Division of Police, we have our policies and procedures and general police orders to address pursuits and to address non-deadly and deadly force incidents. If we discover officers or supervisors that did not comply with our general police orders or rules and regulations, someone will be held accountable."

What about the attorney general's conclusion that the sheer number of cars involved in the pursuit, as many as 62, was a violation of the city's pursuit policy? The supervisor had only authorized three cars to pursue.

"I have no response until our review is completed," said McGrath.

Jackson said the attorney general's investigation and the large number of officers involved in the pursuit have played a role in the pace of the city's investigation.

"We will consider this report and other things, and if, after overlaying that, on what happened that day, then we will determine which officers are within the box, they have no problem, which officers were outside the box, there will be consequences," said Jackson.

City officials have not provided a timetable for the completion of their internal investigation.