Election Lawsuit Avoided in Cuyahoga County

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CLEVELAND -- On the day after her team counted the ballots, the Elections Board Director says she had just the type of problems she hoped for yesterday.

Small.

Jane Platten says there is no such thing as a perfectly run election, but the key is to react quickly so that small problems don't become big ones.

"You have things that come up every election, and you have to immediately figure out how to fix small problems. Thankfully, yesterday, nothing went beyond 'small.'"

Those problems included a few scanners that jammed and a few precincts that ran out of provisional ballot envelopes late in the day.

Both issues were quickly fixed.

It looked for awhile like a big problem could develop.

Platten says the Obama campaign was considering a lawsuit because it said hundreds of people were being made to vote a provisional ballot when they should have been given a regular ballot.

A provisional ballot, normally given when a voter has changed their name or address and hasn't notified the elections board, isn't counted until later and can be challenged.

The threat of the suit evaporated after it was determined that the number of voters in question was actually very small.

There were some lines in Cuyahoga County yesterday, but they weren't as long as in past years or in other states.

And that's because 260,000 people voted early - meaning only 355,000 people actually went to the polls in the county on Election Day.

Voter turnout was down slightly compared to the 2008 presidential race.

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