Attorneys Continue to Argue Over Dimora’s Home

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Jimmy Dimora returned to the courthouse in Akron again on Tuesday as a federal prisoner.

Government prosecutors are preparing to make their case to a jury that Dimora's Independence home can be seized because it was a significant part of the his criminal enterprise, comparing Dimora's house to a drug stash house.
Every part of the house, the government is arguing, was used as a part of the, "enterprise".
Federal prosecutors say the telephones were used, the proceeds from bribes were stored, and meetings were held at the house.

"Just like IBM has a headquarters, the enterprise had a headquarters," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Antoinette Bacon

Prosecutors say Dimora worked from his house most days from the testimony during his trial, and showed up at the county offices only for meetings.

Prosecutors say Dimora conducted the affairs of the government through bribery and fraud. Its highly relevant that the things of value were either located in his house, or evidence of things of value were located in his house. Including bank records that show payments were made.

"This was the stash house." argued Bacon.
Dimora's defense team is trying to save their client's home from government seizure.
"Because he did some work from these places does not make that location a source of influence," said defense attorney Andrea Whitaker.

Defense attorneys want the government to give Dimora credit for the checks he eventually wrote to companies that did work at his home.

Assistant U.S. Attorney James Morford then compared Dimora's crimes to someone who takes money from a bank.

"When you have someone who frauds a bank, or whatever, then pays back what the bank has lost, they still are [responsible] for the full amount," said Morford. "There is no credit when the fraudster, or whatever, pays the money back."

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