DOT Wants Block on Mobile Devices During Driving

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CLEVELAND, Ohio --

Jeannie Frangos, of Broadview Heights, travels for her job.

"I use my GPS a lot while driving," said Frangos.

But every time Jeannie goes to program her GPS, she has to pull over and park.

"I can't use it while driving. Your car has to be stopped to put in the information, and then you can start your route," added Frangos.

Well, if the Department of Transportation (DOT) has its way, that same technology would apply to cell phones and other electronic devices.

Recently, the department proposed new guidelines that would disable mobile devices that allow drivers access to social networks and other activities while the car is moving.

Basically, drivers wouldn't be able to text, browse the internet, or look at their Facebook and Twitter profiles while driving.

"I think it's a great idea for a young kid. I don't want my young cousins texting and driving. I'm more concerned about people around me. I don't text and drive," said Jodi Hall, of Cleveland.

"I don't necessarily think you need to disable the phone because you never know. It could be an emergency call that you get," said Delicia Terry, of Cleveland.

"I think any kind of legislation that would curb distracted driving is beneficial to everybody on the road," said Patrolman Norm Kekic with the Parma Police Department.

According to Parma police, distracted driving is a big problem for traffic enforcement.

"I've seen people drift into oncoming traffic because they are looking down at their phone texting. I've seen them literally stop in the middle of the road because they are texting and that causes a backup. People will rear-end people. There's a lot of accidents that happen because of it," added Kekic.

At this point, disabling cell phones in cars while it is moving is only in the proposal stage.

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