Too Much Salt? Keep the Chips … Hold the Bread!

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If you are among the millions of Americans who struggle with your sodium intake, you may be surprised by a new report released Wednesday.

The Centers for Disease Control says salty foods like chips and popcorn are no longer at the top of the list of worst salt offenders.  The CDC says the biggest source of sodium in the American adult diet comes from an unlikely source: bread!  Just one slice of the yummy carbohydrate can have over 200-milligrams of salt. That, in addition to all the other things we eat in a day and it could lead to trouble.

Robin Watkins of Cleveland Heights says, "I want to live a long time so I have to follow the doctor's order."  She was diagnosed with high blood pressure two years ago. Her doctor's order was to limit the amount of her daily salt intake.

But the CDC says it's not what we add at the dinner table that's sounding off the alarm, but breads and rolls. A new report says the average American consumes more bread everyday, more so than salty snacks.

Gina Bayliss, a clinical dietician at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, says it is a growing problem, and manufacturers, she says, are partly to blame. Bayliss says, "It seems to have to do with promoting a longer shelf life. But bread typically wasn't something I included as the first guideline when following a low sodium diet, so it is something new."

Americans consume about 33-hundred milligrams of salt everyday.  That's a thousand more than what is recommended.  Bayliss adds, "It typically should be less than 23-hundred milligrams, and if you are someone over the age of 51, or if you have hypertension, then you would want to make sure that it's actually less than 1-thousand five hundred."

In addition to excess salt in breads, the CDC says people are also consuming more sodium from foods they order in restaurants, deli lunch meats, pizza and soups. The experts say you can jump-start a healthier lifestyle by eating more fruits and vegetables.  You can also check food labels and choose low salt options when eating out, to avoid high sodium foods.

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