I-Team: Wrongfully convicted man ordered to wear ankle bracelet

CLEVELAND -- The FOX 8 I-Team is investigating why a man has been ordered to wear an ankle bracelet and spend time on parole even though he won a court battle to come home after spending 15 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit.

FOX 8 brought you the story last week of Ru-El Sailor. A judge released him after determining he shouldn’t have been convicted of murder.

We’ve learned after getting released, Sailor was surprised when state parole authorities told him he’d have to wear an ankle bracelet so he can be monitored by authorities 24-7 for 120 days. And, he cannot leave the state.

Sailor told the I-Team, "I thought I was a free man. Come to find out, I wasn't free at all." He added, "It wasn't part of the deal, period. It wasn't brought up about me being on parole or an ankle monitor, period."

So when Ru-El Sailor walked out of the Justice Center, why wasn't he a completely free man? The I-Team contacted the judge and the Ohio Department of Corrections.

The Department of Corrections says all inmates get the ankle bracelet for 120 days when they come home to Cleveland from a maximum security prison as Sailor did.  The State considered his overall record. So, he could be on parole for up to three years.

Judge Nancy McDonnell referred us to the parole authorities. When she released Sailor, she scolded him because he committed perjury. He lied at the time of the murder case.

Attorney Kimberly Corral said, "We're not gonna let it go." Corral plans to go back to court filing papers to get Sailor off parole and get that ankle bracelet removed. She argues, there’s no legal justification for him to be on parole in a case like this. She added, "Until he's got no oversight, and you know, he's entitled to all the rights and freedoms and privacy the rest of us are, we're just gonna keep fighting."

Sunday, Sailor enjoyed going to a Cavs game, and got to spend time in the owner’s box. Slowly, he’s catching up on what he missed. He said, "I just feel like, in so many words, like I'm being bullied."

Sailor, meantime, wants to start a business. He says he wants to start an “affordable service” to help taxi families to visit their loved ones in prison around the state. He’s already working on some things to make that happen.

There’s also a GoFundMe page set up to help him as he gets back to everyday life.

**Continued coverage, here**