‘I am broken…’: Names of victims in Florida school shooting slowly being revealed

PARKLAND, Florida  -- A football coach. An athletic director. And young, fresh-faced students.

They are among the 17 people killed by a gunman at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday.

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said Thursday that all families who lost loved ones in the shooting have been notified. He said police will release a full list of the victims later in the day.

"Today is a day of healing, today is a day of mourning," Israel said.

Here are the victims who have been publicly identified so far:

Nicholas Dworet

Dworet, a senior at Stoneman Douglas high school, was killed in the shooting, the University of Indianapolis confirmed. Dworet was recruited for the university swim team and would have been an incoming freshman this fall.

"Nick's death is a reminder that we are connected to the larger world, and when tragedy hits in places around the world, it oftentimes affects us at home," said Robert L. Manuel, University of Indianapolis president.

"Today, and in the coming days, I hope you will hold Nick, his family, all of the victims, as well as the Parkland community and first responders in your prayers."

Aaron Feis

(Photo Credit: Twitter)

Feis, the assistant football coach, was killed when he threw himself in front of students to protect them from oncoming bullets, according to Lehtio. He suffered a gunshot wound and later died after he was rushed into surgery, Lehtio said.

"He died the same way he lived -- he put himself second," she said. "He was a very kind soul, a very nice man. He died a hero."

Colton Haab, a 17-year-old junior who had a close relationship with Feis, told CNN he saw the coach running toward the sounds of gunshots.

"That's Coach Feis. He wants to make sure everybody is safe before himself," Haab said.

"(He) made sure everyone else's needs were met before his own. He was a hard worker. He worked after school, on the weekends, mowing lawns, just helping as many people as possible," Haab added.

Jaime Guttenberg

Guttenberg was among those who died in the school shooting, according to a Facebook post by her father, Fred.

Jamie Guttenberg (Photo Credit: Facebook/CNN)

"My heart is broken. Yesterday, Jennifer Bloom Guttenberg and I lost our baby girl to a violent shooting at her school. We lost our daughter and my son Jesse Guttenberg lost his sister.

"I am broken as I write this trying to figure out how my family gets through this. We appreciate all of the calls and messages and we apologize for not reacting to everyone individually," he added. "Hugs to all and hold your children tight."

Skidmore College, which Fred Guttenberg attended, released a statement saying their hearts go out to Jaime's parents and others affected by the tragedy.

"There really are no words to lessen the suffering that the families of victims are feeling at this moment, but perhaps knowing that we stand with them can provide some small measure of solace," the college said.

Chris Hixon was reported to have been killed in the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High by a spokeswoman for the school's football program.

Chris Hixon

Hixon, the athletic director for Stoneman Douglas High School, has been reported dead, according to Denise Lehtio, the communications director with the school's varsity and junior varsity football program.

Lehtio told CNN that the football coach at Douglas told her Hixon was shot and killed.

Joaquin Oliver

Joaquin Oliver was known by his nickname "Guac," short for "guacamole," because many couldn't pronounce his first name.

"My friend will literally never get to say, 'I graduated high school,'" said Tyra Hemans, a 19-year-old who said she has been friends with Oliver since they were freshmen.

Hemans said she last saw her friend at school the day of the shooting.

"It was just a brief 'Happy Valentines,'" she said. "He was with his girlfriend and I was just like, 'Oh my God, you guys are so cute."

She added, "He's just a goofball. He's the only kid you'd know that would dye his hair bleach blond, walk around school, put some tiger stripes in and just be unique. He was a unique soul."

Meadow Pollack

Meadow Pollack's parents called her phone repeatedly only to hear it ring, as they kept an anxious vigil outside the hospital. But on Thursday, her father, Andrew Pollack, confirmed that his daughter was among the dead, the Palm Beach Post reported.

Eighteen-year-old Pollack, a senior, had planned to attend Lynn University, her father said.

"Her life was taken way too soon and I have no words to describe how this feels," friend Gii Lovito posted on Facebook.

Family friend Adam Schachtel said in a Facebook post that "an angel was taken away from us in that horrific tragedy ... no words can be said so just prayers and sadness."

Alyssa Alhadeff

An amateur soccer club said one of its players, Alyssa Alhadeff, was among the students killed in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Parkland Soccer Club posted on its Facebook page that Alhadeff was a "loved and well respected member of our club and community."

The club posted a note it said was from her family which read: "To Alyssa's Friends honor Alyssa by doing something fabulous in your life. Don't ever give up and inspire for greatness. Live for Alyssa! Be her voice and breathe for her. Alyssa loved you all forever!"

Alaina Petty

Fourteen-year-old Alaina Petty was among those who died in the shooting, great-aunt Claudette McMahon Joshi confirmed in a Facebook post.

"There are no hastags for moments like this, only sadness," she wrote, asking people to lift up Petty's family in prayer.

Petty attended a local Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Petty was a "valiant young member of the Coral Springs Ward," Church leader Stephen E. Thompson wrote in an update.

Scott Beigel

Students said geography teacher Scott Beigel, 35, helped them enter a locked classroom to avoid the gunman and paid for the brave act with his life.

"If the shooter would have come into the room, I probably wouldn't be speaking to you now," student Kelsey Friend told Good Morning America.

Friend said when she heard gunshots and realized it wasn't a drill she followed other students toward the classroom.

Beigel "unlocked the door and let us in," she said. "I thought he was behind me, but he wasn't. When he opened the door he had to relock it so we could stay safe, but he didn't get a chance to."

Student Bruna Oliveda said she saw Beigel blocking the door.

"I don't know how we're alive," she said.

**Continuing coverage on the shooting here**