Newburgh Heights Police warn drivers about lack of salt on roadways

NEWBURGH HEIGHTS--While some Northeast Ohio communities are running low on their salt supply, others are left with no salt at all to treat snow covered roads.  That is prompting a warning for drivers in at least one community.

The Newburgh Heights Police Department posted a warning for drivers on Facebook.

"We essentially are out of salt," said Newburgh Heights Mayor Trevor Elkins.

The next time snow falls in the village don't expect the roads to be salted.

"Being completely out of salt, what we do is we have to make additional passes with our snow plows so that we can try to clear as much of the snow off, so when it does warm up or become sunny, it's easier for that to melt away,"  Mayor Elkins said.

"I don't know if there is sharing between the various areas in terms of sharing salt or not, but perhaps another area has excess salt and can provide some here to Newburgh Heights," said one driver who works in the village.

In fact, Newburgh Heights does purchase salt from neighboring Cuyahoga Heights.

However, their salt storage building is virtually empty, with just enough salt to fill a couple of trucks.

"We've kind of become accustomed to mild winters, so everyone in general has either ordered less salt than they normally do or is using more salt than they were anticipating," said the mayor.

"It sounds like it could be dangerous for the residents," said another drive who works in the village.

"I didn't know they were running out of salt, but I just never see them doing the side streets, but I didn't know it was a salt problem," said another driver.

Mayor Elkins says the square mile village of 2500 people, has eight miles of roads to cover.

He says crews had already been conserving salt before they ran out.

"We don't salt from the beginning of the road to the end of the road, we typically salt the major roads, Harvard Avenue, Washington Park Boulevard and then we do what's called sensible salting, so we're salting near the intersection, so as cars come to stop signs, they can stop," said Mayor Elkins.

Mayor Elkins says he believe the village will get salt to last them through the rest of the winter.  He says it could be a week or two before they can get a shipment, but he hopes it will be sooner.