Did Amelia Earhart survive flight? New photo could change history

A newly-discovered photo could change history.

According to the History Channel, new evidence suggests Amelia Earhart may have survived her final flight back in 1937.

A photo was found buried in the National Archives and the History Channel says it could hold the key to solving one of history’s all-time greatest mysteries.

During her pioneering flight, 39-year-old Earhart disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean.

According to the History Channel, most experts believe she likely ran out of fuel and crashed, but no trace of Earhart; her navigator, Fred Noonan; or her plane, was found.

The History Channel reports new evidence from U.S. government archives suggests Earhart may have crashed in the Marshall Islands, and was captured by the Japanese military where she died while being held prisoner.

The newly-discovered photo reportedly  shows Earhart sitting on a dock; a ship can be seen towing a barge with an airplane on the back.

Shawn Henry, a former executive assistant director of the FBI who worked with the History Channel on an upcoming documentary on Earhart, says “this absolutely changes history.”

“I think we proved beyond a reasonable doubt that she survived her flight and was held prisoner by the Japanese on the island of Saipan, where she eventually died,” Henry said.

The documentary airs Sunday night on the History Channel.

**Read more on Amelia Earhart, here**