Which local politicians are attending Donald Trump’s inauguration?

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CLEVELAND -- At least two dozen lawmakers have vowed to boycott the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump this coming weekend, including Cleveland area U.S. Representative Marcia Fudge.

Fudge, a Democrat, confirmed the decision on Twitter Sunday after making the announcement during a nationally televised interview.

She says she is staying at home in Cleveland as a show of unity with Georgia Civil Rights Leader and Congressman John Lewis, who has questioned the legitimacy of Trump's presidency.

Among those who are planning to attend is Brunswick Mayor Ronald Falconi.

Falconi, a Republican, who is the son of Filipino immigrants and married to a Filipino immigrant, says he understands that there will always be political differences between officials of different political parties, but believes the inauguration should be a moment in time when even politicians should rise above them.

"I can certainly understand the congresswoman's position. I mean, her side didn't prevail in November. I have been involved in politics for just about my entire adult life and I have been a part of winning campaigns and I have been a part of campaigns that didn't win," Falconi said.

"In the end, it's a lot bigger than that ... it's a lot bigger than just Republican or Democrat. We are talking about the 58th inauguration of the president of the United States and it's time to put aside our feelings for at least a short period of time and celebrate the peaceful transfer of power," said Falconi.

Fox 8 News asked to speak with Representative Fudge on Monday, but was told she would not be doing any interviews, national or local, until later in the week.

Others from Ohio who plan to attend the inauguration include Congressman Jim Renacci and Ohio Governor John Kasich, who did not support Trump through his nomination in Cleveland this past summer or throughout the campaign.

Both are Republicans.

"No one is going to agree with the president or with congress 100 percent of the time. It's not meant to be that way. We live in a democracy. There are always going to be differences of opinion. There's always going to be elections won and elections lost, but in the end, I still believe we live in the greatest nation in the world," said Falconi.

He believes that while there will always be political debate in Washington, the inauguration is not the place to make a statement.

"I believe that in order for you to work with the administration, at least show that you are willing to work with them. Now, again, Democrats and Republicans will always have differences regardless, and I get that, but I mean it's an inauguration," said Falconi.

**More coverage on President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration, here**