No weapon on man fatally shot by Hudson police: AG’s Office

HUDSON, Ohio -- The FOX 8 I-Team has confirmed through the Ohio Attorney General’s Office that no weapon was found with a student from the Middle East when he was shot and killed by Hudson police.

The man’s family is speaking out from his home country, the United Arab Emirates. Ali Al Ameri told the I-Team, "We want to know what happened, what exactly happened. We don't know anything. I think it's our right to know."

Last week, a Hudson officer shot and killed Saif Al Ameri. He had come to Northeast Ohio to study law at Case Western Reserve University. Witnesses told police he got into a bad crash on the Ohio Turnpike, and then he ran from the scene. A Hudson officer spotted him in some woods, got into some kind of struggle with him, and shot him in the head.

The confrontation happened outside of the view of a police car camera. The video shows the officer drive up and almost immediately start to shout commands and pull his gun.

While investigators did not find a weapon with Al Ameri, they say they’re still looking into why the officer felt threatened. They’re also waiting for test results to find out if the man killed had any drugs or alcohol in his system.

His brother added, “I’m sure 100% he would not take any weapon. Actually, he never smoked a cigarette, so he was never involved in anything.”

More than a week later police tape still marks off the scene. Friday, police from the United Arab Emirates came all the way to Hudson to talk to investigators. Officials from there say they even called the Ohio governor asking for a thorough, fair, and timely investigation.

The Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation is following up on all of the questions. Ultimately, the findings will be reviewed through the Attorney General’s Special Prosecution Unit. Then, the case will go to a grand jury to decide if the shooting was justified or not.

Ali Al Ameri said his brother turned down government jobs to come to America to get a degree in law. "He rejected offers from several government entities. He rejected them because his dream was to get a PHD in law.

We feel bad about him. And I think we lost a good person."

**More coverage on this story, here**