Oberlin College professor fired after anti-Semitic Facebook posts

OBERLIN, Ohio -- An Oberlin College professor has lost her job after posting anti-Semitic rhetoric on her personal Facebook page.

Back in March, the college said Joy Karega, assistant professor of rhetoric and composition, could keep her job after the posts were seen by students and other staff.

Some of the posts claimed that Israel and people of Jewish faith secretly planned the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris last year.

**For previous coverage, watch the video player above**

But Tuesday, the college released a statement saying the board of trustees has voted to dismiss Karega for "failing to meet the academic standards that Oberlin requires of its facility and failing to demonstrate intellectual honesty."

The statement continues:

"As a Board, we agree with President Krislov and every faculty committee reviewing this matter that the central issues are Dr. Karega’s professional integrity and fitness. We affirm Oberlin’s historic and ongoing commitment to academic freedom.

During this process, which began with Dr. Karega’s posting of anti-Semitic writings on social media, Dr. Karega received numerous procedural protections: she was represented by counsel; she presented witness testimony, documents, and statements to support her position; and she had the opportunity to cross-examine witnesses testifying against her.

The faculty review process examined whether Dr. Karega had violated the fundamental responsibilities of Oberlin faculty members – namely, adherence to the “Statement of Professional Ethics” of the American Association of University Professors, which requires faculty members to “accept the obligation to exercise critical self-discipline and judgment in using, extending and transmitting knowledge” and to “practice intellectual honesty.”

Contrary to this obligation, Dr. Karega attacked her colleagues when they challenged inconsistencies in her description of the connection between her postings and her scholarship. She disclaimed all responsibility for her misconduct. And she continues to blame Oberlin and its faculty committees for undertaking a shared governance review process.

For these reasons, the faculty review committees and President Krislov agreed on the seriousness of Dr. Karega’s misconduct. Indeed, the majority of the General Faculty Council, the executive body of Oberlin’s faculty, concluded that Dr. Karega’s postings could not be justified as part of her scholarship and had “irreparably impaired (her) ability to perform her duties as a scholar, a teacher, and a member of the community.”

In the face of Dr. Karega’s repeated refusal to acknowledge and remedy her misconduct, her continued presence undermines the mission and values of Oberlin’s academic community. Thus, any sanction short of dismissal is insufficient and the Board of Trustees is compelled to take this most serious action."

Continuing coverage here.