Presidential politics: Too old to run?

If Donald Trump wins the election in November, he will be the oldest person elected for a first term as president. He is 70.

If Hillary Clinton wins, she will tie current record-holder Ronald Reagan, who was 69.

The age issue was ignited this weekend after Clinton had to leave a 9/11 memorial service for what her campaign initially called an episode of “overheating.” Video showed her stumbling as she was assisted into a van to leave the ceremony. It was later revealed that she was still campaigning despite a diagnosis of pneumonia last Friday.

Trump said Monday that he had a medical exam last week and will release the results “when the numbers come in.”

Under law, a candidate must be at least 35 years of age to run for president. There is no age at which a person is considered too old to run. But should there be?

According to a report on the political website fivethirtyeight.com, age is a potent risk factor for any number of diseases including heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Former President Ronald Reagan announced he had Alzheimer’s disease in 1994, a few years after leaving office. Some have speculated that he started showing signs of the illness during his second term in office.

There are other jobs that have mandatory retirement ages. Airline pilots, for example, have to retire at age 65.

Half of the S&P 500 boards have set the retirement age at 72 for their directors.

Experts caution that age isn’t a perfect proxy for health and note that life expectancy for Americans has risen over time, fivethirtyeight.com reported.

What do you think? Head over to our Facebook page to let us know. Todd Meany might read your comments on air during Plugged In from 6:30 – 9 a.m.