Liability concerns among reasons why police in North Carolina back out of RNC

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CLEVELAND, Ohio - Two police departments that had previously committed to help provide security in Cleveland during the 2016 Republican National Convention have decided to back out of that commitment.

Cincinnati police tell the Fox 8 I-Team they have decided against sending officers to Cleveland explaining a former police chief initially planned to send officers here. But a new police administration there has decided against it.

Police in Greensboro, North Carolina have also decided against sending 50 officers that they had previously committed to send.

In a letter to the City of Cleveland, Greensboro Deputy Police Chief Brian James cited several concerns including a lack of confidence in the city of Cleveland and it's preparedness, the requirement for each of the officers to have a physical and their own staffing challenges.

Both Cincinnati and Greensboro also have concerns about liability.

In his letter to Cleveland, Greensboro's Deputy Chief shares concerns that Cleveland will not provide Worker's Compensation Insurance for their officers should they suffer an injury during the event.

CLICK HERE and HERE to read the entire letter.

James says in 2012, when Greensboro helped provide security for the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina provided liability insurance to the officers working the event.

Cleveland Police Patrolman Association President Steve Loomis says the concerns do not surprise him.

"Historically those types of things get settled very very quickly very early in the process it's unfortunate that we are still mucking around with this stuff this late in the process," said Loomis.

"I never met that man (James) before in my life. I have never talked to him and I feel exactly the same way he does about it and we are here. So I applaud him for taking care of his guys and I know his guys want to come up here and help us out, that's truly the sad part about this whole thing," said Loomis.

Fox 8 also reached out to the police department in Tampa, Florida which hosted the Republican National Convention in 2012.

The City of Tampa had commitments for help from dozens of police departments and agencies to help secure their city during the convention.

Tampa Police Spokesperson Janelle McGregor said in the weeks and months leading up to the convention not one of the departments that committed to help backed out of that commitment.

Loomis says FEMA has recommended the city will need help from 4,000 officers during the convention.

He says they are still far short of that number and the Cleveland officers who will be working the event still have not been properly trained.

The City of Cleveland on Friday did not respond to the decision by Greensboro Police.

On Wednesday, Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams assured the media that everything will be fine.

"We are not at full strength where we want to be, but we are very close to that. You know, every day I sign agreements with outside agencies to come and help secure the convention. So we are getting there, we are close, we are on schedule I should say.