Study says spanking increases likelihood of ‘undesired outcomes’ in children

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A new study reveals some scary side effects to spanking.

The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Michigan looked at 50 years of research on spanking in the study published in the “Journal of Family Psychology.”

More than 160,000 children were involved.

The research indicates that kids who get spanked are more likely to have mental health problems and aggression later on in life.

“We found that spanking was associated with unintended detrimental outcomes and was not associated with more immediate or long-term compliance, which are parents’ intended outcomes when they discipline their children,” said Elizabeth Gershoff, an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

The authors say spanking actually does the opposite of what parents usually want it to do and makes kids more likely to act up.

For much  more on the study, click here.