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Co-pilot fired from previous job months before deadly plane crash in Akron, NTSB report says

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AKRON, Ohio-- The National Transportation Safety Board has released reports related to an Akron plane crash that killed nine people on November 10, 2015.

More than 1,100 pages offered a glimpse of details gathered by federal investigators in their search for answers as to why a Hawker Plane owned by Florida-based ExecuFlight crashed.

**CLICK HERE for the full report**

The findings showed the first officer and co-pilot, Renato Marchese, who was flying the plane, had been terminated from a previous job nine months earlier “due to unsatisfactory work performance.”

Details from his training indicated he “fell behind in training, ”struggled with memory items” and “struggled with weight and balance problems.”

Results from toxicology tests showed neither the 50-year-old co-pilot nor his 40-year-old captain in charge, Oscar Chavez, had drugs in their system.

The plane was on approach to Akron Fulton International Airport from Dayton when it went down shortly before three in the afternoon, crashing into a 4-plex apartment building.
Minutes prior to the deadly accident, the captain could be heard on the plane’s flight recorder coaching his first officer.

Quotes included in the transcript were “You can’t keep decreasing your speed.” When questioned as to why, the captain said to the co-pilot: “Because we are going to stall; I don’t want to sta…”

Less than two minutes later, the captain said, “You’re diving; you’re diving. Don’t dive. Two thousand feet per minute, buddy,” meaning the plane was losing altitude at a rate of 2,000 feet per minute.

Thirty seconds later, the aircraft’s computer weighed in, telling the crew to “pull up.”
The final words recorded inside the cockpit were, “Oh, oh, oh...”

A spokesperson for the NTSB told Fox8 it could be weeks or months before a final conclusion to the investigation is released.

More stories on the plane crash here.