Clearview school bus routes changed due to pothole issues throughout Lorain

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

LORAIN - Pothole riddled roads were so bad in one Lorain neighborhood, school buses wouldn’t stop there.

Blame it on holes in the pavement along Lorain’s West 38th Street. They’ve become so deep the Clearview School District moved its bus stops farther away.

One fourth grader who lives on Lexington Avenue and attends classes in the Clearview District now has to walk three blocks along a busy street with no sidewalk. His mother, who asked their names not be used, said she didn’t know what had happened until the bus failed to show on the first day of school. She told Fox 8 she called the district’s bus garage manager who informed her of the change.

“He said as long as the roads are in the condition that they are that he will not permit the buses to come back here due to the amount of damage that was occurred last year”

Lori Garcia, Manager for the Department of Public Property, said “If the school would have notified us that they were gonna change the bus route, one, we would have tried to get here before school started to alleviate that.”

Garcia said Lexington Avenue and nearby Dayton Avenue have been “unimproved” roads since they were annexed into the city of Lorain more than fifty years ago. She said residents typically paid assessments when improvements were made.

That never happened and no work was planned until the city bought a paver back in June.

The paver will allow a more cost effective approach to paving roads, allowing the city to schedule work along W. 38th Street without charge to residents. Garcia admitted calls from Fox 8 News and other media prompted the city to move up its work schedule to Monday.

Crews had been scheduled for mid-September. A hot patch crew arrived on Wednesday afternoon in preparation for next week’s job, convincing residents they were in fact getting new pavement.

"I believe they will do it now, I hope they will," said the 10-year-old’s mother.

While some expressed relief, there was concern the new pavement wouldn’t last. Several residents said nearby wetlands sometimes overflowed onto their streets and there were no storm sewers to catch the water.

It’s a valid concern according to Garcia. She said there were no sewers for the same reason the streets were never paved. Residents will have to pay for it themselves because of their street’s “unimproved” status.