How a piece of Parmatown Mall could be yours

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PARMA, Ohio -- A piece of the former Macy’s department store at Parmatown Mall can be yours.

The mall, now called Shoppes at Parma, is donating 100 bricks from the demolished building to raise money for local kids.

“They’re more than just bricks; they’re really a historic piece of Parma history,” said Michelle Devlin, with Shoppes at Parma.

The bricks are available to the public at a cost of $20 each, and they're inscribed with the dates the department store was in operation.

“We had multiple requests from people in the community asking if they could have a piece of that building, whether because their mother worked there or they shopped there as a child,” Devlin said.

The money will benefit the Parma Youth Commission, a newly-formed group for Parma high schoolers to become involved in local government and the community.

“Our vision for that commission is to hear the voice of young people in Parma. It’s a voice that’s often left out and as we know young people have a lot of ideas. They think outside the box,” said Parma City Council President Sean Brennan, who advises the group.

The money may be used to fund any project costs.

“We want to involve them in helping decide where Parma’s going in the future because we want them to stay here and be a part of what we have,” Brennan said.

The department store, which opened in 1960 as a May Company store, was torn down in January as part of $70 million mall renovation, which will lead to several new stores by the time it's completed. Construction is expected to be done by fall, 2016.

To order a brick, contact the Parma City Council offices at 440-885-8091 or email Brennan HERE.

Members of the Parma Youth Commission also plan to sell bricks at a table at the 4th Annual Run/Walk for Pierogies, which begins at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 5 at the Tri-C Western Campus on Pleasant Valley Road in Parma.