North Ridgeville Residents Ready to Air Their Flooding Worries

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NORTH RIDGEVILLE, Ohio-- One week after storms sent as much as eight feet of water into some homes in North Ridgeville, residents continue to take their filthy, water-soaked belongings to the curb.

With many of the victims of the flooding doing the work themselves, the American Red Cross continues to pass out clean-up kits in the community.

Some people are still calculating their losses, which they estimate to be in the thousands.

"Virtually this time because it was up to the ceilings, we lost everything, all Christmas stuff, all the kids' stuff; everything is just absolutely ruined, " said John Griffiths of Debbie Drive who had 84 inches of water in his home.

Griffiths is among residents expecting to pack city council chambers late Monday prepared to air their concerns in a public forum.

"I don't know if it's because there's so much building in the city that they are not able to keep up. We just don't want it to happen again," said Angela Haschka.

"When this was designed in the 1970s, it was adequate for what was here, but with all the expansion and everything else that's been done in the city, specifically since 1989 when we had the first flood, there's just no way, the creek has the capability of taking the water out," said Bob Pemberton of Debbie Drive, who also intends to address council.

North Ridgeville Mayor David Gillock said people have a right to be upset.

Gillock told FOX 8 News that he is aware many North Ridgeville residents are looking for answers.

"I don't know if anybody has all the answers," Gillock said on Monday.

"We have been addressing issues and are working dilligently on them," said Gillock, who explained that the city has hired engineers and are trying to address issues continually relating to the sewage.

"We are aware of it," said Gillock, explaining the flooding of last Monday as a 500-year event.

Gillock knows people are anxious to air their concerns. "We are all in this together."

Read more stories on the storm damage.